Please read the following terms of service carefully before using this website. This is a legally enforceable contract that affects your legal rights, including with respect to how claims and disputes are resolved.

Terms of Service

This website is operated by Justin W John, JWJ-WPU (“JWJ”, “I”, “we”, “us” or “our”). By visiting or using our site or related applications or services or by purchasing something from us on or in connection with our site (collectively, the “Service”), you agree to be bound by the following terms and conditions (“Terms of Service”), including those additional terms and conditions and policies referenced herein and/or available by hyperlink. If you do not agree to all the terms and conditions of these Terms of Service, then you may not access our website or use any related applications or services.
By agreeing to these Terms of Service, you represent that you are at least the age of majority in your state or province of residence, or that you are the age of majority in your state or province of residence and you have given us your consent to allow any of your minor dependents to use the Service.

Copyrights

All artwork and content on this website (www.justinwjohn.com) is legally protected by U.S. & International copyright laws.
Under NO circumstance is it permitted for anyone to use ANY images or content found on this website, any social media platform, printed and/or digital format original to Justin W John, JWJ-WPU. This includes for personal use (as in screen savers, or printed out for household decor) or for commercial purposes. Proper and prior permission from Justin W John, or legal advisers, must be obtained to legally reuse these materials.
Unauthorized duplication or usage for commercial purposes is prohibited by the Copyright law and will be prosecuted. We protect our copyright interests.
Justin W John, JWJ-WPU, retains all of the copyrights to all artwork on this site, regardless of having sold the original image. You must contact him or his legal advisors in order to use an image for commercial purposes, whether or not you now own the original artwork.
Thank you for your cooperation.

Privacy Policies


Return Policy

All sales are final. Only on a case by case basis under extenuating circumstances, at discretion, will any refunds be issued; same for accepting cancellations, or exchanges. Separate terms apply for commission based sales. If a refund is granted, please allow processing time of funds as determined by the issuing bank. PayPal transactions subject to their terms and policies.

Sales Tax

Sales Tax is charged to orders shipped within the state of Idaho. The applicable tax rate for orders within the state of Idaho is 6%. Shipping cost is also taxed. Sales tax is not charged to orders shipped to states outside of Idaho.

Third-Party Links

This site may contain links to third-party websites or applications. Such linked sites are only for your convenience, and we do not endorse any content, products or services available on such sites. We are not responsible or liable for any content, products or activities associated with any third-party website or application, including without limitation if such sites or products infringe any intellectual property or privacy rights; are inaccurate, incomplete or misleading; are not merchantable, safe or fit for particular purpose; do not provide adequate security; contain viruses or other harmful items; or are libelous or defamatory. Please review the third party’s policies and practices and make sure you understand them before you engage in any transaction.

User Content

We take no responsibility and assume no liability for any comments posted by users or any third party. We may, but have no obligation to, monitor, edit or remove content that we determine in our sole discretion are unlawful, offensive, threatening, libelous, defamatory, pornographic, obscene or otherwise objectionable or violates any party’s rights or these Terms of Service. You agree that your comments will not violate any right of any third party, including any copyright, trademark, privacy, publicity or other personal or proprietary right. You further agree that your comments will not contain libelous or otherwise unlawful, abusive or obscene material. You may not use a false e-mail address, pretend to be someone other than yourself, or otherwise mislead us or third parties as to the origin of any comments. You are solely responsible for any comments you make and their accuracy. If you post any content to a publicly available portion of the Service, you grant other users the right to use, modify, copy and distribute such content.
If you provide any submissions (for example contest entries), creative ideas, suggestions, proposals, plans, or other materials, whether online, by email, by postal mail, or otherwise (collectively, “Feedback”), you agree that we may, at any time, without restriction, edit, copy, publish, distribute, translate and otherwise use in any medium any Feedback that you provide to us. We are not under any obligation (1) to maintain any Feedback in confidence; (2) to pay compensation for any Feedback; or (3) to respond to any Feedback.

Changes to Terms of Service

You can review the most current version of our Terms of Service at any time on this page. We reserve the right to update, change or replace any part of these Terms of Service by posting updates and/or changes to our website. It is your responsibility to check this page periodically for changes. Your continued use of or access to the Service following the posting of any changes constitutes your acceptance of those changes.

Internet Data Retention Information

What are cookies in computers?
Also known as browser cookies or tracking cookies, cookies are small, often encrypted text files, located in browser directories. They are used by web developers to help users navigate their websites efficiently and perform certain functions. Due to their core role of enhancing/enabling usability or site processes, disabling cookies may prevent users from using certain websites.
Cookies are created when a user’s browser loads a particular website. The website sends information to the browser which then creates a text file. Every time the user goes back to the same website, the browser retrieves and sends this file to the website’s server. Computer Cookies are created not just by the website the user is browsing but also by other websites that run ads, widgets, or other elements on the page being loaded. These cookies regulate how the ads appear or how the widgets and other elements function on the page.
Standard uses for browser cookies
Website servers set cookies to help authenticate the user if the user logs in to a secure area of the website. Login information is stored in a cookie so the user can enter and leave the website without having to re-enter the same authentication information over and over. 
Session Cookies are also used by the server to store information about user page activities so users can easily pick up where they left off on the server’s pages. By default, web pages really don’t have any ‘memory’. Cookies tell the server what pages to show the user so the user doesn’t have to remember or start navigating the site all over again. Cookies act as a sort of “bookmark” within the site. Similarly, cookies can store ordering information needed to make shopping carts work instead of forcing the user to remember all the items the user put in the shopping cart.
Persistent or tracking Cookies are also employed to store user preferences. Many websites allow the user to customize how information is presented through site layouts or themes. These changes make the site easier to navigate and/or lets user leave a part of the user’s “personality” at the site.
Cookie security and privacy issues
Cookies are NOT viruses. Cookies use a plain text format. They are not compiled pieces of code so they cannot be executed nor are they self-executing. Accordingly, they cannot make copies of themselves and spread to other networks to execute and replicate again. Since they cannot perform these functions, they fall outside the standard virus definition.
Cookies CAN be used for malicious purposes though. Since they store information about a user’s browsing preferences and history, both on a specific site and browsing among several sites, cookies can be used to act as a form of spyware. Many anti-spyware products are well aware of this problem and routinely flag cookies as candidates for deletion after standard virus and/or spyware scans.
The way responsible and ethical web developers deal with privacy issues caused by cookie tracking is by including clear descriptions of how cookies are deployed on their site. These privacy policies should explain what kind of information is collected and how the information is used. Organizations using the cookies initiative started by IAB Europe include: InviteMedia Networkadvertising.org : and Antor
Most browsers have built in privacy settings that provide differing levels of cookie acceptance, expiration time, and disposal after a user has visited a particular site. Backing up your computer can give you the peace of mind that your files are safe.
Other cookie-based threats
Since identity protection is highly valued and is every internet users right, it pays to be aware of what threat cookies can pose. As cookies are transmitted back and forth between a browser and website, if an attacker or unauthorized person gets in between the data transmission, the sensitive cookie information can be intercepted. 
Although relatively rare, this can happen if the browser is connecting to the server using an unencrypted network like an non-secured WiFi channel. Internet security is only attainable if you regualrly use a anti-virus protection program. 
Other cookie-based attacks involve exploiting faulty cookie-setting systems on servers. If a website doesn’t require browsers to use encrypted channels only, attackers can use this vulnerability to trick browsers into sending sensitive information over insecure channels. The attackers then siphon off the sensitive data for unauthorized access purposes.
New Laws for the use of cookies and other technologies that store online user information. On May 26th 2011, new rules governing the use of cookies by websites comes into force in Europe. Rather than the “Opt out” option for website visitors, websites will need to specifically gain the consent of their visitor and they must “Opt In” to be able to store cookies on their computer or other devices.This is expected to be difficult to manage and enforcement will more than likely be done subtlely and with encouragement rather than with the threat of fines and penalties.
What does the new law say?
The new requirement is essentially that cookies can only be placed on machines where the user or subscriber has given their consent. 
6 (1) Subject to paragraph (4), a person shall not store or gain access to information stored, in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user unless the requirements of paragraph (2) are met.
(2) The requirements are that the subscriber or user of that terminal equipment–
(a) is provided with clear and comprehensive information about the
purposes of the storage of, or access to, that information; and
(b) has given his or her consent.
(3) Where an electronic communications network is used by the same person to store or access information in the terminal equipment of a subscriber or user on more than one occasion, it is sufficient for the purposes of this regulation that the requirements of paragraph (2) are met in respect of the initial use.
“(3A) For the purposes of paragraph (2), consent may be signified by a subscriber who amends or sets controls on the internet browser which the subscriber uses or by using another application or program to signify consent.
(4) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to the technical storage of, or access to, information–
(a) for the sole purpose of carrying out the transmission of a communication over an electronic communications network; or
(b) where such storage or access is strictly necessary for the provision of an information society service requested by the subscriber or user.
Key tips for safe and responsible cookie-based Web browsing
Due to their flexibility and the fact that many of the largest and most-visited websites use cookies by default, cookies are almost unavoidable. Disabling cookies will lock a user out of many of the most widely-used sites on the Internet like Youtube, Gmail, Yahoo mail, and others. Even search settings require cookies for language settings. Here are some tips you can use to ensure worry-free cookie-based browsing:
  • Customize your browser’s cookie settings to reflect your comfort level with cookie security or use the cookie cleaner included in Abine’s free Privacy Suite.
  • If you are very comfortable with cookies and you are the only person using your computer, you may want to set long expiration time frames for storing your personal access information and browsing history.
  • If you share access on your computer, you may want to set your browser to clear private browsing data every time you close your browser. While not as secure as rejecting cookies outright, this option lets you access cookie-based websites while deleting any sensitive information after your browsing session.
  • Install and keep anti-spyware applications updated.
  • Many spyware detection, cleanup applications, and spyware removers include attack site detection. They block your browser from accessing websites designed to exploit browser vulnerabilities or download malicious software.
  • Make sure your browser is updated.
  • If you haven’t already, set your browser to update automatically. This eliminates security vulnerabilities caused by outdated browsers. Many cookie-based exploits are based on exploiting older browsers’ security shortcomings.
  • Cookies are everywhere and can’t really be avoided if you wish to enjoy the biggest and best websites out there. With a clear understanding of how they operate and how they help your browsing experience, you can take the necessary security measures to ensure that you browse the Net confidently.