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ART + DESIGN

JWJ STUDIO. BOI, ID.

JWJ STUDIO

ART + DESIGN

JWJ STUDIO.

ART + DESIGN

JWJ STUDIO.

SEDUSA
(2021) Acrylic, gouache, ink, pastel, and spray paint on gallery stretched canvas. 24 x 24 x 1.5 inches. Photo: Justin W John
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Acrylic, Ink, Spray Paint, Conte Crayon, Soft Pastel
Stretched Canvas
None
24 x 24 x 1.5 inches

Using a base coat of grey, the end result might look like the skin of an elephant or a turbulent dark muddy sea. But for me, it represents the physical brain, grey matter, and the weathering of time. Each piece starts out reminiscent of a Rorschach inkblot test—a dark mass on a white field. A silhouette emerges and color then surrounds and covers the white to bring life and emotion.

This work is from my new series on mental health, depression, and other inner workings of the human brain in relation to prescription drugs, addictions, therapy, undoing, and the process to feel “complete”.

“Alterity is at the foundation of Medusa’s force, which was alive and present in the minds and memories of ancient viewers. Her very presence is foreign, dangerous, and potent, as are her specific characteristics. In the Odyssey, her head was kept in Hades to drive the living from the world of the dead. The Perseus myth provides us with the phenomenon that her face and gaze could turn men to stone. Pindar preserves the tale that the Gorgon’s cries were awesome and awful. Perseus and Athena were required to control such threatening forces and harness their power. Medusa is a deadly and cryptic other, but she is also ubiquitous, with an undeniable energy that inspired artists to repeat her semblance and story in diverse ways across literature, lore, and art through ancient Greece, Rome, and beyond.”
Glennon, Madeleine. Department of Greek and Roman Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. March 2017. https://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/medu/hd_medu.htm

Relying heavily on texture formed through a distinct drying process that allows the acrylic to dry at different time intervals—restricting air exposure while gravity pulls the paint slowly under a sheet of plastic. The paint is shaken then poured down between the canvas and plastic, pockets of air form then bubble up leaving various sized holes, ripples, creases, and variations of sheen.

Original available
The Other Art Fair ROW DTLA
The Other Art Fair LA ROW DTLA
The Other Art Fair LA ROW DTLA